Vegan Swiss Alpine Macaroni – Älplermagronen

Hello, my potato noses! Today the mountain is calling again. Sorry, it’s almost becoming standard here with Swiss recipes. But I simply have to take you with me on this culinary Alpine adventure. Because these vegan Swiss alpine macaroni are the Swiss epitome of comfort food for cold days. And I dare say that this is exactly the kind of comfort food we all need at the moment. And you don’t even have to leave your four walls, except perhaps to get the ingredients. Now, even the biggest mountain haters are certainly on board. And I promise you that our alpine excursion will not involve cow poop, snow, or any other unwanted surprises.
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vegan Swiss alpine macaroni

Honestly, how often do potatoes and pasta actually come together in a dish? It’s often a rather frowned-upon combination. However, precisely this concentrated load of carbohydrates comes together in these Swiss alpine mac and cheese. Even the mountains turn pale with envy. And we indulge in a food coma afterwards.

And for the bravest among you, try the vegan Swiss alpine macaroni with apple sauce and fried onions. That’s how we Swiss eat the dish. And yes, it does take an effort to put applesauce on top of this hearty, satisfying dish. But some people order pizza with pineapple! 🫢

The history of Swiss alpine macaroni

Who invented it?
Well, the Swiss… Wait, aren’t there noodles in the original Älplermagronen recipe? Yup, the candidate has 100 points. I would therefore venture to say that we Swiss cannot take full credit for the invention of Älplermagronen. After all, it was the Italian guest workers who came to Switzerland to build the Gotthard tunnel which brought pasta to us.
And although, according to various sources, pasta already existed in Switzerland before that. Before the 20th century, pasta was reserved for the rich who could afford it. Historians also assume that the term “magronen” is derived from the Italian word “maccheroni”.

Swiss alpine macaroni is considered a traditional Alpine dish. This is because the Alpine dairymen quickly realized how durable and light the pasta was. The perfect conditions, because who wants to lug kilos of flour and eggs up to the alp to make their pasta, which is then already unpalatable after two days?

And even without the dealers of today, lacing was already a well-known practice back then. So the dairymen simply mixed some cheap potatoes and onions into the macaroni. So they had a) saved on pasta and b) conjured up a filling, simple, and quick dish that could be prepared on the fire in no time after the strenuous work on the alp.

vegan Swiss alpine macaroni
original Swiss alpine macaroni recipe vegan

Vegan vs. original Swiss alpine macaroni recipe

According to my research, the original recipe usually contains macaroni with eggs, potatoes, onions, cream, and cheese. In the version I know, diced bacon is also mixed in. Swiss nostalgia par excellence! Vegan compatibility zero, you might think at first glance.

First, it sounds more difficult than it is. The dish is super easy to veganize with today’s selection of vegan products. Take macaroni without egg, e.g. from Barilla, plant-based cream, and vegan bacon cubes. I have linked you to the brand I used. So roll up your sleeves and off you go! 💪🏻

Potatoes for Swiss alpine macaroni

Firm-boiling potatoes – like waxy varieties – are very suitable for Swiss alpine macaroni. They retain their firmness to the bite during the cooking process. It is not wrong to use starchy potatoes. This type of potato makes the dish creamier, as it has a less firm consistency. However, they may disintegrate during cooking and the dish will then have a mushy consistency.

Traditionally, potatoes and pasta are cooked together. It is therefore essential to observe the different cooking times, otherwise it won’t work. Potatoes need about 15-20 minutes, macaroni usually only 10 minutes.

Original Swiss alpine macaroni recipes often state that only as much liquid should be used so that the potatoes and pasta soak up all of it.
Bonne Chance Luigi! After several burned and black pan bottoms, I have come to accept that it also works if there is still cooking liquid left. So save yourself the effort. After all, who has time to stand next to the pot all the time? If you want to test it, go for it, I won’t stand in your way. ☺️

Cheese for vegan Swiss alpine mac

Cheese has one property in particular and that is called umami. And no, it’s not another indefinable additive, but simply a flavor, like sweet or sour. So task number 1 is to bring umami into this veganized dish. *scratching head*… How does that work? 🤔

Quite simply, take nutritional yeast and a light miso paste and you have replaced the heartiness of the cheese. If you prefer, you can of course use a vegan cheese substitute. However, please test beforehand whether the brand used also melts. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Or mix some oil into the vegan cheese so that it melts.

original Swiss alpine macaroni recipe vegan
original Swiss alpine macaroni recipe vegan

As already mentioned, vegan Swiss alpine macaroni tastes best with crispy fried onions. And for those who like it, served with apple sauce. This is how they are traditionally eaten.
But you don’t always have to stick to traditional standards, you can also experiment a little. How about pears and apple pieces mixed in? Or veggie leftovers mixed in? If you like it spicy, you can also add some chili. Or serve them with a brown sauce or mushroom sauce instead of the cream and cheese sauce.

In general, vegan Swiss alpine macaroni are an absolute culinary masterpiece, as they are the perfect leftover dish. Not just for leftover jacket potatoes and cooked pasta. Other veggie leftovers can also be mixed in.

Why are you still hesitating? Wield your wooden spoon and embark on this culinary journey into rustic Swiss cuisine. Your palate will not regret it.

Bon appétit!

original Swiss alpine macaroni recipe vegan
original Swiss alpine macaroni recipe vegan

Vegan Swiss Alpine Macaroni – Älplermagronen

Hello my potato noses! Today the mountain is calling again. Sorry, it’s almost becoming standard here with Swiss recipes. But I simply have to take you with me on this culinary Alpine adventure. Because these vegan Älplermagronen are the Swiss epitome of comfort food for cold days. And I dare say that this is exactly the kind of comfort food we all need at the moment. And you don’t even have to leave your four walls, except perhaps to get the ingredients. Now, even the biggest mountain haters are certainly on board. And I promise you that our alpine excursion will not involve cow poop, snow, or any other unwanted surprises.
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Course pasta
Cuisine Swiss
Servings 4 people*
Calories 851 kcal

Equipment

  • 1 large saucepan
  • 1 frying pan

Ingredients
 

  • 500 g potatoes, waxy
  • 500 g macaroni
  • 1 stock cube
  • 100 g vegan bacon, cubed
  • 2 onions
  • 25 g vegan butter
  • 400 ml plant-based cream
  • 2 tbsp light miso paste approx. 40g
  • 4 tbsp nutritional yeast approx. 20g
  • salt to taste
  • pepper to taste

Instructions
 

  • Pour the water into a large pan and bring to the boil.
  • In the meantime, peel the potatoes and cut into medium-sized cubes.
  • Add the potatoes and stock cube to the boiling water and cook for approx. 15 to 20 minutes.
  • After 10 minutes of cooking, add the macaroni and cook according to the packet instructions.
  • Heat a pan and fry the vegan bacon cubes until they are browned and crispy. Set aside for later.
  • Melt the butter in a large pan, peel and finely dice the onions, and fry in the melted butter until translucent.
  • Add the plant-based cream, miso, and nutritional yeast to the pan and stir until you have a creamy sauce.
  • Drain the cooking water from the potatoes and pasta. Add the potatoes and pasta directly to the pan with the sauce. Stir well and simmer for a further 2 minutes.
  • Add the vegan bacon, mix well again and serve immediately*.

Notes

* Makes 3 large portions or 4 slightly smaller portions.
*Tip: In Switzerland, Swiss alpine macaroni is often served with apple sauce and/or fried onions.

Nutrition

Calories: 851kcalCarbohydrates: 134gProtein: 24gFat: 24gSaturated Fat: 4gCholesterol: 1mgSodium: 714mgPotassium: 1169mgFiber: 9gSugar: 19gVitamin A: 249IUVitamin C: 15mgCalcium: 73mgIron: 4mg
Tried this recipe?Mention @velvetandvinegar or tag #velvetandvinegar!

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